FTC Approves Final Consent Settling Charges that Made in USA Brand, LLC Deceived Consumers

Made in USA Brand logo

Following a public comment period, the Federal Trade Commission has approved a final consent order settling charges that a company providing a “Made in USA” certification seal to marketers did so without verifying the companies’ Made in USA claims, or disclosing that the companies had certified themselves. Read more of this post

Ft. Lauderdale International Boat Show Oct. 30 – Nov 3, 2014 – host 55th Annual

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Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show

Fort Lauderdale, Florida, the “Yachting Capital of the World” will host the 55th Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show on October 30-Nov 3, 2014. Show exhibits range from yacht builders and designers to exotic cars and brokerage yachts. A wide variety of boats and sea vessels will be on display including runabouts, sportfishers, high performance boats, center consoles, cabin cruisers, flats boats, skiffs, express cruisers, sailing yachts, motor yachts, bowriders, catamarans, ski boats, jet boats, trawlers, inflatables, canoes, and extraordinary superyachts.

Covering six locations and over 3 million square feet of space, the show’s transportation network of bus shuttles, water taxis, and riverboats ensures attendees can easily navigate the boat show and its expansive waterways system.

 

Palm Beach International Boat Show 2014

PalmBeach-Slide2014

The 29th Annual Palm Beach International Boat Show, March 20 – 23, 2014, is one of the top five boat shows in the country – featuring more than $1.2 billion  worth of boats,  yachts  and accessories from the world’s leading marine manufacturers. It is truly an International Show. The event includes hundreds of Boats from 8 foot inflatables, power boats, fishing boats, center consoles, bow riders, personal watercraft to superyachts over 150’. Show entrances will be located at  Evernia St./Flagler Dr. (waterfront) and North Clematis St./Flagler Dr. (waterfront).

Global Pet Expo

global pet expo

 

Global Pet Expo, the pet industry’s largest annual trade show, is presented by the American Pet Products Association (APPA) and Pet Industry Distributors Association (PIDA).

The 2013 Show featured 964 exhibitors, 2,686 booths and more than 3,000 new product launches. 5,327 pet product buyers from around the world attended.

In 2014, Global Pet Expo will take place March 12-14 in Orlando, Florida. Global Pet Expo is open to independent retailers, distributors, mass-market buyers, and other qualified professionals

- See more at: http://globalpetexpo.org/

Bloomberg Bowing to Chinese?

The-New-York-Times-icon

A lengthy New York Times report makes the case that Bloomberg News has softened its coverage of China for fear of having its reporters kicked out of the country.

Editor-in-chief Matthew Winkler denies the allegation, but the Times musters a great deal of evidence, starting with one Bloomberg story that hasn’t seen the light of day:

“The investigative report they had been working on for the better part of a year, which detailed the hidden financial ties between one of the wealthiest men in China and the families of top Chinese leaders, would not be published.

“In the call late last month, Mr. Winkler defended his decision, comparing it to the self-censorship by foreign news bureaus trying to preserve their ability to report inside Nazi-era Germany, according to Bloomberg employees familiar with the discussion.

“‘He said, “If we run the story, we’ll be kicked out of China,”’ one of the employees said. Less than a week later, a second article, about the children of senior Chinese officials employed by foreign banks, was also declared dead, employees said.

“Mr. Winkler said in an email on Friday that the articles in question were not killed. ‘What you have is untrue,’ he said. ‘The stories are active and not spiked.’”

In that case, the real test will be whether Bloomberg ever publishes them.

In a statement, Bloomberg News expresses disappointment in the Times piece and says “it is absolutely false that we postponed these stories due to external pressure.” But what about the kicked-out-of-China quote?

US Manufacturing Races Against ‘Biological Clock’

Moneynews Logo

By Michael Kling

The lack of young people entering the manufacturing field threatens the future of the U.S. manufacturing renaissance, warns a new study.

Older workers, who dominate manufacturing, are leaving the work force in droves, but few young people are entering the field to replace them, according to the study from information and technology company ThomasNet.com. The study included responses from 1,209 engineers and purchasing agents, business owners and managers and sales and marketing executives from manufacturers, distributors and service companies.

Over three-fourths of manufacturing employees are 45 and older, the survey indicates.

“With Generation Y (18 to 32 years old) expected to make up 75 percent of the work force by 2025, and older employees exiting in droves, manufacturing’s ‘biological clock’ is ticking away,” the report notes.

Yet most manufacturers show a lack of urgency to fill their pipeline with skilled workers.

Three-quarters of companies surveyed say 25 percent or less of their work force are in the Generation Y age group. While 29 percent say they will increase employment of Generation Y workers in the next two years, almost half expect their numbers to stay the same.

Manufacturers say negative perceptions about work in their industry prompts young people to avoid the sector. But instead of being dirty, boring work, modern manufacturing is a high-tech world of computer-aided design and production. Half of survey respondents say a career in their industry provides satisfaction as well as competitive wages and benefits.

The shortage of skilled workers comes at a time when the industry is rebounding. Over half of manufacturers grew in 2012 and nearly two-thirds expect to grow this year. Nearly seven out of 10 will introduce new products this year.

“Considering that many companies (42 percent) are increasing employee headcount this year, the time to cultivate a new work force is now,” the study stresses.

Lack of basic skills in young workers is a drawback.

Manufacturers are developing partnerships with schools to help improve training and increase their emphasis on science, technology, engineering and mathematics. “The jury is out on whether these efforts alone will be enough,” the study says.

The United States is well-positioned to revitalize its manufacturing sector, says Philip Odette, president of Global Supply Chain Solutions, in an article for ManufacturingNet, an industry news site.

“The only thing missing is enough skilled workers to maintain the momentum.”

Companies must work to educate young people about the advantages of a career in manufacturing, he explains.

“Even something as simple as recording yourself demonstrating a process can boost the credibility of your company and increase its presence in the minds of students and teachers in your local area,” he advises. “Videos of new equipment or an impressive process don’t have to be reserved to sales pitches — they can be investments in attracting a new work force.”

Source: http://www.moneynews.com/Economy/manufacturing-skill-workers-US/2013/11/07/id/535317

Factory fire causes nationwide knish shortage

 Gabila Food Products, Inc. shows their original Coney Island square knishs, which have been off the market for at least six weeks. A fire at a Long Island factory billed as the world’s biggest maker of knishes has led to a nationwide shortage of the fried, square doughy pillows of pureed potatoes and other fillings. (AP Photo/Gabila Food Products, Inc.)

Gabila Food Products, Inc. shows their original Coney Island square knishs, which have been off the market for at least six weeks. A fire at a Long Island factory billed as the world’s biggest maker of knishes has led to a nationwide shortage of the fried, square doughy pillows of pureed potatoes and other fillings. (AP Photo/Gabila Food Products, Inc.)

COPIAGUE, N.Y. –  A fire at a factory billed as the world’s biggest maker of knishes has created nationwide shock and oy for those who can’t seem to find the Jewish treats anywhere.

Kvetching has been going on at delis, diners, food carts and groceries since the six-week-long shortage began, but lovers of the square fried doughy pillows of pureed potatoes may not have to go without much longer. The factory promises an end to the knish crunch by Thanksgiving, which coincides with the start of Hanukkah.

“Our customers … are calling us saying they are literally searching supermarkets and stores and they’re all asking when we’ll be back,” Stacey Ziskin Gabay, one of the owners of the 92-year-old Gabila’s Knishes, which sells about 15 million knishes a year.

A fire Sept. 24 at the Gabila’s plant in Copiague, Long Island, damaged the machinery that makes the company’s biggest seller — “The Original Coney Island Square Knish,” which also come filled with kasha or spinach.

Gabila’s, which also makes matzoh balls, blintzes and latkas, sells the knishes both online and at retail outlets around the country, with New York, Florida and California leading the sales.

“For the last month I haven’t had any knishes — my heart is broken,” said Carol Anfuso, a native New Yorker who has been without a knish to nosh since the BJ’s Wholesale store near her Atlanta home suddenly stopped stocking them.

But Anfuso didn’t learn of the shortage until she visited her sister for lunch at the Pastrami King restaurant in Merrick, Long Island, and found that it was out of stock, too.

Pastrami King owner Joe Yamali said he normally sells about 2,000 knishes a month.

“It brings you back to your childhood and they’re just so delicious,” Yamali said. “Gabila is square and fried. You bite into it and the potato oozes out. It’s very good.”

Katz’s Delicatessen, the 125-year-old landmark on Manhattan’s Lower East Side, ordinarily sells about 6,000 knishes a month.

“I usually get four to take home,” grumbled Brooklyn native Forrest Gurl. “Their crunchiness, their hard corners, the mustard and sauerkraut you put on them. You can’t beat a knish.”

Like most places, the round, baked version is still available. But Gurl harumphed a familiar sentiment of knish devotees: “Who gets round knishes?”

Jesse Hochberg, a retired IT employee, didn’t know there was a shortage until he got to the Katz’s counter.

“I miss them,” he said.  “It’s something I grew up with. I like the taste, sliced with mustard. … I always look for them, and I haven’t seen them recently.”

Katz’s chef Kenny Kohn has grown weary of explaining the shortage to customers.  Along with the pastrami sandwiches, he serves up a typical New York attitude to the ongoing complaints.

“Get over it! Get a life! It’s just a knish.”

SEMA Show 2013 Las Vegas

SEMA 2013

 

Specialty Equipment Market Association

SEMA Show takes place November 5 – November 8, 2013 at the Las Vegas Convention Center

The SEMA Show is the premier automotive specialty products trade event in the world. It draws the industry’s brightest minds and hottest products to one place, the Las Vegas Convention Center. In addition, the SEMA Show provides attendees with educational seminars, product demonstrations, special events, networking opportunities and more.

SEMA Show 2012 drew more than 60,000 domestic and international buyers. The displays are segmented into 12 sections, and a New Products Showcase featured nearly 2,000 newly introduced parts, tools and components. In addition, the SEMA Show provides attendees with educational seminars, product demonstrations, special events, networking opportunities and more…

The SEMA Show is not open to the general public. The SEMA Show is a trade-only event and only qualified individuals employed within the automotive aftermarket industry are permitted to enter the convention center.

 

FDA: 12% of imported spices are adulterated by filth

FDA: 12% of imported spices contaminated with insect parts, salmonella, hair

Ryan Jaslow

Ryan Jaslow
CBS News

Americans feasting on meals seasoned with imported spices may be getting more than they bargained for: animal feces, insect parts, disease-causing bacteria, and other foreign contaminants.

A report released Oct. 30 from the Food and Drug Administration estimates that about 12 percent of imported spices are adulterated by filth, a rate almost two times higher than that of other FDA-imported food shipments received during the same time-frame.

Most spices consumed in the United States are imported with the exception of dehydrated onion, the agency notes.

The agency developed this new risk profile of spice imports after looking at data collected between 2007 and 2010. They found contamination with “filth adulterants” including animal excrement, insects (live and dead, whole or in parts), hair from humans, rodents and other animals, decomposed parts, and other materials like stones, twigs, staples, wood slivers, plastic, synthetic fibers and rubber bands.

The most common additions, in order, were insect fragments, whole/equivalent insects and animal hair.

Nearly all insects found were pests associated with stored products, which might suggest inadequate packaging. When there’s rodent hair, that typically means rodent feces contaminate the product as well, according to the FDA.

The report primarily focused on risk for salmonella, the only spice-related pathogen they found linked with human illness and food recalls. The agency however noted other microbes including bacillus, clostridium perfringens, cronobacter, shigella and staph bacteria have also been found in spices.

Overall, there have been 14 U.S. illness outbreaks linked to imported spices since 1973, resulting in more than 1,900 illnesses, 128 hospitalizations and two deaths. Ten of the outbreaks were linked to Salmonella bacteria.

Black pepper was implicated as a culprit in four of the outbreaks, in addition to red pepper, white pepper, curry, fennel seed, turmeric and some seasoning mixes. Countries of origin included Brazil, China, India, Malaysia, South America, Turkey and Vietnam.

FDA testing revealed about 6.6 percent of imported spices tested during the three-year study period contained salmonella. Of the more than 80 types of the bacteria found, nearly 7 percent showed antibiotic resistance.

Nearly 750 shipments of spices were refused entry to the U.S. due to salmonella, while nearly 240 were refused entry because of presence of filth.

Tests were not completed on spices already being sold at retail grocery stores or restaurants.

Salmonella when ingested may cause an infection within 12 to 72 hours called salmonellosis. Symptoms include diarrhea, fever and abdominal cramps, which typically resolve in a week. However, some people — such as the elderly, infants and those with weakened immune systems — may develop more severe diarrhea and need to be hospitalized.

The agency’s report sums up the current safety issues and which control mechanisms are in place to stop contamination. Poor or inconsistent application of preventive measures to reduce salmonella contamination, such as cooking preparation or engaging in pathogen reduction treatments, were identified in several of the previous outbreaks.

The Food Safety Modernization Act gives the FDA new tools to protect against contaminated imports, including authority to mandate recalls and increase inspections of foods.

Jane M. Van Doren, a food and spice official at the FDA, told the New York Timesthe new report was a “wake-up call” to spice producers.

“It means: ‘Hey, you haven’t solved the problems,’” she said.

© 2013 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Source document: http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-204_162-57610216/fda-12-of-imported-spices-contaminated-with-insect-parts-salmonella-hair/

Made in the USA: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

Originally posted on machineuptime:

It used to be that saying Made in the USA went a long way. Consumers were proud to purchase goods made here in America, and it was almost a given. Then outsourcing came along, and many companies were forced to send their business overseas in order to stay competitive; cheaper foreign labor meant keeping production costs down.

Thankfully, American manufacturing is now making a major comeback, as reshoring is bringing business back to American soil. Along with it, Made in the USA is also making a comeback, with small and large businesses—as well as consumers—again realizing the true value in U.S. manufacturing.Flag_of_the_United_States_(Pantone).svg

According to a recent article in Time magazine, “American workers are busy making things that customers around the world want to buy — and defying the narrative of the nation’s supposedly inevitable manufacturing decline.” Large companies such as Apple and Airbus, along with small businesses, are bringing business…

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