Sportsmen Prefer Products Made in U.S.A.

Bass Resource

 

Sportsmen Prefer Products Made in U.S.A., But There’s a Catch

 

FERNANDINA BEACH, Fla. — When asked how important it is for American sportsmen to buy products made in the United States, surveyed hunters and shooters overwhelmingly support the idea of “buying American.” In fact, according to a recent HunterSurvey.com and ShooterSurvey.com poll, 95 percent of those surveyed indicated it was somewhat important (41 percent) or very important (54 percent) for sportsmen to buy products made in this country.
When asked about the perceived quality of American products versus foreign-made firearms and associated gear, 65 percent of the same surveyed group believes products made in the United States are generally better than foreign-made ones and 34 percent believe they are generally about the same level of quality. Only two percent felt American products were generally inferior to foreign-made goods.
With more than 90 percent of those surveyed citing the importance of buying American and feeling the products made here are just as good or better, it would seem firearms and hunting items made in other countries would have difficulty getting a foothold among U.S. buyers. But not so fast! Price, it appears, plays as much a role if not a bigger one in making purchase decisions than where an item is made.
Asked if two competing products had the same quality and functional benefits, but one was Made in the U.S.A. and the other was not, how much more would the Made in U.S.A. product have to cost before the person purchased the other product? The results were telling:
•    Up to five percent more expensive, more than 12 percent of respondents admitted they would buy the other product.
•    At five to 10 percent more, that number jumped another 16 percent.
•    10 to 20 percent more, the number of sportsmen opting to buy the non-U.S. product skyrockets to over 23 percent.
By the time a United States product is 20 percent more than one made overseas, 51 percent of those surveyed said they would buy the overseas product. As soon as it hits 20 to 30 percent more, that number jumps another 18 percent.
“Like most consumers, sportsmen certainly consider the price and value of a product before spending their hard-earned dollars,” says Rob Southwick, president of Southwick Associates, which designs and conducts the surveys at HunterSurvey.com, ShooterSurvey.com and AnglerSurvey.com. “The survey results merely underscore the importance of American companies to be able to compete on an equal footing with foreign competitors when it comes to pricing. When all things are equal at the cash register, most sportsmen will opt for the American-made product.”
To help continually improve, protect and advance hunting, shooting and other outdoor recreation, all sportsmen and sportswomen are encouraged to participate in the surveys at HunterSurvey.com, ShooterSurvey.com and/or AnglerSurvey.com. Each month, participants who complete the survey are entered into a drawing for one of five $100 gift certificates to the sporting goods retailer of their choice.

 

Original Link: http://www.bassresource.com/bass_fishing_123/sportsmen-usa-103113.html

“Buying American” Generally Matters More to Women Than Men

Harris Importance of Buying American March 2013 woman

A majority of American adults believe that it is important to “buy American” across a variety of product types, according to results from a Harris Interactive survey, even if the definition of what constitutes an “American” product is not universally shared by respondents. Interestingly, while there were few gaps in the importance placed on “buying American” among Republicans and Democrats responding to the survey, women were more likely than men to feel it more important for each product category identified.

For example, women were:

  • 11% more likely to consider “buying American” important when purchasing major appliances (79% vs. 71%);
  • 10% more likely to consider it important for furniture purchases (78% vs. 71%);
  • 15% more likely to place importance on this factor when buying clothing (77% vs. 67%);
  • 14% more likely to find it important for car purchases (74% vs. 65%); and
  • 20% more likely to consider it important when buying home electronics (72% vs. 60%).

On each count, 18-35-year-olds were significantly less likely than any other generation to believe that “buying American” is important to them.

The survey finds that the definition of what constitutes “buying American” isn’t universally agreed upon. Three-quarters agree that a product needs to be manufactured within the US for them to consider it “American,” while a slight majority believe that it needs to be made by an American company for them to consider it “American.” Close behind, 47% agree that a product needs to be made from parts produced in the US for them to consider it “American.”

As the researchers note, the company perceived by respondents to be the most “American” – Ford – increasingly has cars which include parts produced abroad. Other companies showing up in the most “American” list – such as GE and Levi Strauss – also outsource some of their operations overseas.

Regardless of the extent to which these companies’ products meet consumer definitions, “Made in America” packaging can influence consumers. A study released last year by Perception Research Services found that about 8 in 10 shoppers notice “Made in the USA” claims in packaging, and about three-quarters of those believe that such claims make them more likely to buy the product.

According to the Harris survey results, the most commonly-cited important reasons for “buying American” are to keep jobs in America (90%), to support American companies (87%), and due to quality (83%) and safety (82%) concerns with products assembled outside of the US.

About the Data: The Harris Poll was conducted online within the United States between December 12 and 18, 2012 among 2,176 adults (aged 18 and over). Figures for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, region and household income were weighted where necessary to bring them into line with their actual proportions in the population. Propensity score weighting was also used to adjust for respondents’ propensity to be online.

Data for the “What company do you consider to be most ‘American’” question was conducted online within the United States between January 2 and 4, 2012 among 2,126 adults (aged 18 and over). Figures for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, region and household income were weighted where necessary to bring them into line with their actual proportions in the population. Propensity score weighting was also used to adjust for respondents’ propensity to be online.

Source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/topics/automotive/buying-american-generally-matters-more-to-women-than-men-27559

 

o learn more about Made in USA Certification: http://www.USA-C.com

MADE IN USA CERTIFIED LOGO

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