OK Food Inc. Recalls 933,272 lbs of Breaded Chicken Products Due To Possible Foreign Matter Contamination

 Class: I Recall 030-2017
Health Risk: High
Congressional and Public Affairs
Maria Machuca
(202) 720-9113
Press@fsis.usda.gov 

The ready-to-eat (RTE) breaded chicken items were produced on various dates from Dec. 19, 2016 through March 7, 2017. A list of the products subject to recall can be found here PDF | View Labels.

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US farm income seen falling for fourth straight year

 

 

Farmers Work a Second Shift to Supplement Income

Farmers Work a Second Shift to Supplement Income

An elderly man walks up the path to his farm in Cortland, Nebraska. American farmers who grow barley, millet and other minor grains earn 84 percent of their income by working off the farm. | Photo credit: Joel Sartore, NG Creative

The “average” American farmer earns an income above most Americans—but that’s often because they’re hustling in a second-job off the farm, according to data released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture last week. Read more of this post

Was That Steak Raised In The USA? Soon, It’ll Be Hard To Know

Was That Steak Raised In The USA? Soon, It'll Be Hard To Know

Country-of-origin labels — like this one, on a package of steak at a grocery store in Lincoln, Neb. — tell consumers where their meat comes from. | Grant Gerlock/NET News

An attachment to the last-minute spending proposal going before Congress this week would end a six-year trade dispute between the U.S. and Canada. If it’s passed, as seems likely, the omnibus budget bill would repeal a law called COOL that requires “country-of-origin labels” on meat. Read more of this post

USDA Searches Globe for Cheap Beef. Congress Works to Ensure it Remains Undifferentiated in U.S.

USDA Searches Globe for Cheap Beef. Congress Works to Ensure it Remains Undifferentiated in U.S.Billings, Mont. – After decades of depressed cattle prices that triggered the unprecedented liquidation of the U.S. cow herd that began in 1996, reports indicate that U.S. cow-calf producers are beginning to experience better times. Read more of this post

The Not So COOL Reason You Won’t Know Where Your Steak Came From

The Not So COOL Reason You May Soon Not Know Where Your Steak Came From

Cases of bovine spongiform encephalopathy—mad cow disease—have been reported in Brazil as recently as 2014. When a cow was found to have died from the neurogenerative disease, which humans can contract by eating meat from sick animals, in 2012, a number of countries suspended beef imports from Brazil as a precaution. The United States was not among them. Read more of this post

R-Calf to USDA: Keep FMD out of The USA

 

R-Calf to USDA: Keep FMD out of The USA, Made in USA Beef, Processed in USA Beef

Billings, MT – R-CALF USA’s two-day convention in Denver, Colo. was jumpstarted by Angus Mc McIntosh, Ph.D., who has served as an expert witness in nationally renowned private property rights lawsuits. Read more of this post

Ohio Pig Population Booming After Last Year’s Deadly Virus

Ohio Pig Population Booming After Last Year's Deadly Virus

© Freeimages.com

Ohio’s swine herds are on the rebound. Read more of this post

US Wants Egg Executives Punished for Salmonella Outbreak

salmonella.eggs

A judge should consider the “widespread harm” done by a major 2010 salmonella outbreak and the food safety lapses that preceded it in sentencing two egg industry executives whose company was responsible, prosecutors said Monday. Read more of this post

Label It Bull: Livestock Regulations Spark Backlash From Meat Producers

cattle U.S.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is facing a backlash from small livestock producers and others over its move to tighten meat-labeling regulations, which would force them to separate animals based on where they were born, raised and slaughtered.

The step is being billed as a way to bring the U.S. into compliance with World Trade Organization agreements, but there are a growing number in the industry who argue it will alienate the country’s trading partners and force small American meat farms out of business.

“Only the government could take a costly, cumbersome rule like mandatory country-of-origin labeling (COOL) and make it worse even as it claims to ‘fix it,” said American Meat Institute President J. Patrick Boyle.

Boyle believes the proposed rule will make the current requirements even more expensive, onerous and disruptive.

The Department of Agriculture recently proposed the new rule for labeling muscle cuts of meat. That means beef, veal, lamb, pork, goat and chicken — which are now labeled as simply a product of one country or more — will have to include additional details including where each animal was born, raised and slaughtered.

The new labeling regulations would force thousands of meat processors and retailers to change the way they label products. The USDA estimates the initial cost would range between $17 million and $48 million.

The USDA’s Agriculture Marketing Service began working on a rule change after the U.S. partially lost a WTO appeal in 2012. “The USDA expects that these changes will improve the overall operation of the program and also bring the current mandatory (country of origin labeling) requirements into compliance with the U.S. international trade obligations,” USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack said in a statement.

The National Farmers Union praised the rule change as an “excellent response.”

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