CERTIFIED, INC. $20 MILLION FUNDING

CERTIFIED, INC. $20 MILLION FUNDING

Boca Raton, Florida – Nov. 21, 2016 – CERTIFIED, INC. has announced an agreement with Switzerland-based Galileo Asset Management SA (galileoam.com) to assist in the acquisition of $20 million of equity funding. Such funding will expedite CERTIFIED’s international distribution and usage of their breakthrough disruptive smartphone VERITY™ scanning app. Read more of this post

2013 Fort Lauderdale Boat Show

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Made in USA News will be attending:

Fort Lauderdale, Florida, the “Yachting Capital of the World” will host the 54th Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show on October 31-Nov 4, 2013. Show exhibits range from yacht builders and designers to exotic cars and brokerage yachts. A wide variety of boats and sea vessels will be on display including runabouts, sportfishers, high performance boats, center consoles, cabin cruisers, flats boats, skiffs, express cruisers, sailing yachts, motor yachts, bowriders, catamarans, ski boats, jet boats, trawlers, inflatables, canoes, and extraordinary superyachts. Covering six locations and over 3 million square feet of space.

SHOW SCHEDULE

Oct 31 – Nov 4, 2013

Prime Time Preview:
Thurs. Oct 31, 10am – 7pm

General Admission:
Fri. Nov 1, 10am – 7pm
Sat. Nov 2, 10am – 7pm
Sun. Nov 3, 10am – 7pm
Mon. Nov 4, 10am – 5pm

To schedule an interview or press release  on or before: Wednesday October 30th between 9:00 to 2:00

email: adam@usa-c.com or mobile 561-789-1139

 

Mexican Trade War Looms Over Winter Tomatos

U.S. business groups said on Tuesday they were worried about a damaging trade war with Mexico if President Barack Obama’s administration follows through on a preliminary decision to terminate a 16-year-old tomato trade agreement.

“We think the U.S.-Mexico economic relationship is tremendously important,” Patrick Kilbride of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce told reporters on a conference call. “We don’t want to see another trade war ignited.”

Florida tomato growers have pressed the Obama administration since June to terminate a 1996 agreement with Mexico on the grounds it fails to protect them against Mexican tomatoes sold in the United States below the cost of production.

Florida growers historically compete with Mexico for the U.S. winter and early spring tomato market. Terminating the pact would clear the way for Florida growers to file a new anti-dumping case against their Mexican rivals.

Last week, the U.S. Commerce Department stopped short of immediately tearing up the agreement, but took a preliminary position in favor of ending the pact. It promised a final decision “as soon as practicable” and in no more than 270 days.

The decision surprised Mexican officials and tomato producers, who have offered to renegotiate the pact. They argue the agreement has benefited U.S. consumers and brought stability to the North American market.

Bill Reinsch, president of the National Foreign Trade Council, said business groups were concerned the Obama administration might rush to make a final a decision ahead of the Nov. 6 presidential election, in which Florida is expected to play a decisive role.

Seven Reasons Outsourced U.S. Bank IT Jobs Are Heading Back Onshore

Some bank IT jobs that have been outsourced for the past 10 years or so are coming back stateside, at least according to one expert. “A number of banks have told me they’re pulling back work from offshore, particularly from India but not only India,” says Harley Lippman, founder and chief executive of Genesis10, an IT consulting and staffing firm based in New York. “India is still the epicenter of IT work for major banks, although some work has gone to China, Eastern Brazil and other locations.”

Lippman doesn’t have numbers to back this observation. “I’m gathering that as we speak,” he says. “A lot of people are interested in that.”

Lippman’s own company has benefited from this trend, although he declined to name any bank clients. His firm is hiring in Troy, Michigan; Atlanta (where it just opened a new facility); Grand Rapids, Mich.; and Kansas City, Mo. “That’s all driven by bank client demand,” Lippman says.

Some banks are bringing the work back in house, but the majority are finding an onshore outsourcing provider, Lippman says. “In all banks there’s head-count pressure; there continues to be cost pressure, there’s pressure on execution and delivery for all the major banks,” he says. Outsourcing offers variable costs and the flexibility to ramp up and down as the volume of work fluctuates.

Offshoring made sense 10 years ago, when a New York City programmer might have cost $100 an hour, versus $15 an hour for a worker with similar skills in India, Lippman says. “Today it’s very different, the world is more flat,” he says. “Jeffrey Immelt,” the General Electric chief executive, “said there’s no more cheap labor; I found that quite significant.” Inflation is over 20% in India.

Why are banks turning from offshoring to onshoring? Lippman offers several reasons:

Read more of this post

Unemployment rises in 20 states, falls in 15

By CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER, AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON – The unemployment rate rose in 20 states last month as employers in most states shed jobs.

The Labor Department says the unemployment rate rose in 20 states and fell in 15. It was unchanged in another 15 states. That’s nearly the same as in November, when the rate rose in 21 states, fell in 15 and was the same in 14.

The report is evidence that the job market is barely improving even as the economy grows. Most economists expect hiring to pick up this year, although the unemployment rate will likely remain high.

Employers in most states didn’t add any net new jobs last month. The number of jobs on employer payrolls fell in 35 states in December, the department said. Only 15 states reported gains. Layoffs have slowed dramatically in the past year, but hiring has yet to pick up.

Texas and South Carolina reported the biggest net job gains in December. Texas added 20,000 positions; South Carolina gained 9,000.

Nevada, still suffering from a massive housing bust, posted the nation’s highest unemployment rate at 14.5 percent. That’s up from 14.3 percent the previous month and the state’s highest on records dating from 1976. California reported the second-highest rate, at 12.5 percent, followed by Florida at 12 percent.

North Dakota’s unemployment rate of 3.8 percent was the nation’s lowest. It’s followed by Nebraska and South Dakota, with 4.4 percent and 4.6 percent, respectively.

 

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