Peanut butter substitute recalled after E. coli outbreak

Associated Press

A peanut butter substitute sold by an Illinois company is being recalled because 12 cases of E. coli have been linked to the product.

Glenview-based I.M. Health SoyNut Butter Co . is voluntarily recalling its SoyNut Butter products.

E. coli cases in Arizona, California, Maryland, New Jersey and Oregon have been linked to the nut-free product

Bite of Peanut Butter Sandwitch

iStock

Illinois public health Director Dr. Nirav Shah says some E. coli infections are mild but others may be life-threatening. Young children are particularly vulnerable.

Health officials recommend people not eat any variety or size of I.M. Healthy-brand SoyNut Butter products or granola coated with the company’s SoyNut Butter.

Whole Foods To Close Nine Stores & Scale Back Expansion Plans

Whole Foods to close 9 stores amid sluggish sales

Whole Foods Market said Wednesday it will close nine stores in the second quarter as it abandons its goal to open 1,200-plus stores.

“We’re going to continue to grow, but I think we’re going to be a more disciplined growth company than we have been in the past,” John Mackey, co-founder and CEO of Whole Foods, told analysts on the company’s first-quarter earnings call.

Mackey called the closing of the nine stores a “difficult but prudent decision” and said the company will now have more targeted site selection and “continued moderation in ending square footage growth.” He said these moves together will “result in a healthier bottom line, increased cash flow and higher returns.”

Still, the Texas-based company also said it welcomed 14 new stores in the first quarter, including two outlet relocations.

Mackey added the retailer remains “optimistic about the future growth potential for our 365 format but we want to see how this next round of stores perform before getting more aggressive.”

Read more of this post

Scientists Use DNA Testing to Detect Seafood Fraud

bluefin-tuna-was-the-only-fish-that-was-labeled-in-100-of-samples

How much did you pay for that slice of halibut sashimi? What about those two pieces of red snapper? According to a study published in the journal Conservation Biology on Friday, you likely paid too much. This may be frustrating news for sushi lovers, but it’s good news for flounder lovers: Any time you’ve been served halibut in a sushi restaurant, rest assured that you probably ate flounder. But the problem is much broader than just this one substitution. Demian Willette, of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of California Los Angeles , and his colleagues found that 47 percent of the samples they collected were mislabeled. That means your odds of getting the sushi you ordered are slightly better than a coin toss.

If you think this is an issue associated with lower-tier sushi joints, think again. Willette and his colleagues had their undergraduate students gather samples over four years from 26 sushi restaurants that were rated highly by customers on Zagat and Yelp in the greater Los Angeles area. They used a genetic testing technique called DNA barcoding, in which particular portions of DNA can be used to identify an individual as part of a species, to verify the identities of the samples. All of the restaurants had at least one incident of mislabeling during the four year period, with an average mislabeling rate of 45.5 percent.

Read more of this post

Alibaba is taking the fight to sellers of counterfeit goods

 

Alibaba sues sellers of counterfeit goods after it was blacklisted by the US
Lucy Nicholson | Reuters

Alibaba (NYSE: BABA) is taking the fight to sellers of counterfeit goods and, for the first time, suing two merchants on one of its e-commerce platforms – just days after it was blacklisted by the U.S. government for hosting fake items.

The Chinese firm filed a lawsuit against two sellers of fake Swarovski watches on its eBay-like Taobao platform with the Shenzhen Longgang District People’s Court, claiming 1.4 million yuan ($201,482) in damages.

While it may not seem like a large amount for a company like Alibaba but the company is hoping to stop others from hosting dodgy items.

Read more of this post

GMOs Kicked Out of U.S. Organics Guidelines

on Monday, Nov 28th, 2016 CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY

usda-organic

The National Organic Standards Board voted unanimously last week to update its U.S. standards to ban ingredients derived from new genetic engineering techniques from certified organic products.

The vote served as a recommendation by the NOSB to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Organic Program. The board says it will ensure ingredients that are derived from new GE techniques will not wind up in organic certified foods and beverages.

“The NOSB is clear that GMOs do not belong in organic,” Dana Perls, senior food and technology campaigner for Friends of the Earth, told TriplePundit. “In the absence of strong federal regulations on the labeling and commercialization of genetic engineering, the organic standard continues to provide consumers with a transparent and clear way to avoid GMOs in the food they eat.”

One of the new GE methods the board is concerned about is synthetic biology, which designs and constructs new organisms to either produce something they would not normally produce or to edit DNA to stop certain traits from being expressed, according to FOE.

Some synthetic biology ingredients are ending up in food and consumer products without sufficient labeling, just as traditional GE ingredients do. GE ingredients in general lack adequate oversight, the group insists. And some are labeled as ‘natural,’ which is incredibly misleading to consumers. Although a few states passed mandatory GE labeling laws, the federal requirements are murky. Back in August, President Barack Obama signed a bill into law that preempts state GE labeling laws, virtually striking them down with what many call a lackluster federal labeling requirementRead more of this post

Consumers Want Transparency: Are You Ready to Respond?

Consumers Want Transparency: Are You Ready to Respond?

Retailers will discuss transparency-related challenges and opportunities at the 2016 Innovation & Collaboration Summit. Read more of this post

U.S. Consumer Spending Rising; Manufacturing Still Weak

U.S. consumer spending rising solidly; manufacturing still weak

A customer looks at merchandise in a Best Buy store in Denver May 14, 2015. | Photo Credit: REUTERS/Rick Wilking

U.S. consumer spending grew at a fairly healthy pace over the past two months, but factory production slipped in August, providing the Federal Reserve a mixed picture of the economy ahead of a rate-setting meeting later this week. Read more of this post

Designer Jean Makers Sued for False ‘Made in USA’ Labels

Designer Jean Makers Sued for False ‘Made in USA’ Labels

Many Americans buy products they believe to be made in the United States because they believe they are of higher quality and because they want to support the U.S. economy.

Read more of this post

Pitching Products to Walmart, in 30 Minutes

Pitching Products to Walmart, in 30 Minutes

Hoping to have their products chosen by the world’s largest retailer, entrepreneurs prepare to make their case during Wal-Mart’s Made in USA ‘Open Call’ in Bentonville, Ark. WESLEY HITT FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

Entrepreneurs, in ‘Shark Tank’ style, try to get their gadgets and foods onto retailer’s shelves

Read more of this post

Trending Products Made in the USA

Trending Products Made in the USA

In a recent study conducted by Consumer Reports, more than 60 percent of people interviewed claimed they would gladly shell out more money for American made products—even if those products cost an average of 10 percent more than products sourced internationally.  Read more of this post

%d bloggers like this: