All Hail Kale: Dogs Love Kale

All Hail Kale

Dogs Love Kale is turning the pet treat category on its ear with a lineup of products that harnesses the power of one of the most nutrient-dense vegetables on the planet.

Sometimes, inspiration strikes when you least expect it. Such was the case with Paula Savarese and Dawn Ward, for whom an afternoon snack of homemade baked kale chips led to a burgeoning, outside-the-box pet treat business. Read more of this post

Global Pet Expo

logo-gpe-white[1]March 16-18, 2016
Orange County Convention Center
Orlando, FL

 

Global Pet Expo, the pet industry’s largest annual trade show, is presented by the American Pet Products Association (APPA) and Pet Industry Distributors Association (PIDA).

The 2015 Show featured 1,051 exhibiting companies, 3,113 booths and more than 3,000 new product launches. Additionally, 6,061 pet product buyers from 82 countries attended.

Global Pet Expo is open to independent retailers, distributors, mass-market buyers, and other qualified professionals.

http://globalpetexpo.org/

Made in the USA: Labeling Lawsuits in America’s Pet Food Industry

Made in the USA: Labeling Lawsuits in America's Pet Food Industry

As of 2015, the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) had become aware of more than 5,000 reports of American dogs that became sick or died after eating chicken jerky pet treats that were made in China, but marketed and sold by allegedly reputable food companies here in the U.S. Read more of this post

Dog Owner Sues Tyson Over ‘Made In USA’ Pet Food Labels

Dog Owner Sues Tyson Over 'Made In USA' Pet Food Labels

A California dog owner filed a putative statewide class action on Wednesday in federal court, accusing Tyson Foods of misleading consumers and violating state laws by intentionally mislabeling pet foods and treats made with ingredients sourced in foreign countries as “Made in the USA” and charging premium prices. Read more of this post

Jerky treats leave nearly 600 dogs dead in ‘mysterious outbreak’, FDA says

dog face

Federal health officials are warning pet owners to be cautious about feeding their dogs jerky treats as they continue to investigate a treat-related illnesses that has left nearly 600 dogs dead and sickened more than 3,000 others.

The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday issued an alert to consumers about the illnesses and deaths tied to jerky treats from China. Officials say the exact cause of the illnesses remains unknown.

“This is one of the most elusive and mysterious outbreaks we’ve encountered,” Bernadette Dunham, director of the FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine, said in a statement. “Our beloved four-legged companions deserve our best effort, and we are giving it.”

The agency has received reports from pet owners and veterinarians about jerky pet treat-related illnesses affecting 3,600 dogs and 10 cats in the U.S. since 2007. Approximately 580 of those pets have died, according to a news release.

The FDA noted a decrease in reports of illnesses earlier this year after a number of pet jerky treats were pulled from the market. Officials say the number of reports may have declined because fewer jerky treats were available to consumers.

Symptoms observed within hours of eating the treats include decreased appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, decreased activity, increased water consumption and increased urination, the agency said. Severe cases have involved kidney failure and gastrointestinal bleeding, the FDA said.

The agency urges owners of pets showing symptoms to consult a veterinarian and save any remaining treats and treat packaging for possible testing.

“Our fervent hope as animal lovers is that we will soon find the cause of—and put a stop to—these illnesses,” Dunham said.

To find out more about Made in USA Certification please visit our website:  www.USA-C.com

Made in USA Certified

Woman says jerky treats made in China made her dog sick

AUSTIN — An Austin pet owner says jerky treats from China almost killed her dog.

Pat Richardson had no idea her dog Allie was sick until she took her to the veterinarian for an annual check-up. A routine blood test revealed her five-year-old Cairn Terrier had kidney problems. Her vet helped her pinpoint the cause to a treat Richardson fed her dog every day.

“It’s a family member, and I thought if I had done something to harm her, it was devastating,” said Richardson.

Richardson fed her dog Waggin Trails chicken jerky treats every morning. They are made by Nestle Purina in China. Purina is now the target of a class action lawsuit connected to animal deaths and jerky treats.

“Those treats said they were chicken breast and glycerin and no other ingredients at all,” said Richardson.

Richardson paid roughly $1,000 in vet bills for her dog Allie to recover.

The FDA is investigating jerky treats from China linked to 2,200 pet illnesses in all 50 states. In the past 18 months, 360 dogs and one cat have died. The FDA has not singled out a specific brand or banned any of the treats.

“We don’t really know where the sickness is coming from or the exact ingredients that’s causing it, so just use care and caution,” said Dr. Shannon James with the Capital Veterinary Clinic.

Dr. James suggests pet owners should read all labels before giving their animals any food.
“If you are going to give a treat, it’s best to know exactly where that treat is being made and how healthy it is for your pet,” said James.
If your pet is having a problem, you can go here to file a report.

Source:http://www.khou.com/community/blogs/animal-attraction/Woman-says-jerky-treats-made-in-China-made-her-dog-sick-170320956.html

How to Save U.S. Manufacturing Jobs

By Howard Wial @CNNMoney February 23, 2012: 5:34 AM ET

Howard Wial is a fellow for the Brookings Institution Metropolitan Policy Program.

At first glance, manufacturing jobs would appear to be a dying breed.

The United States lost 6 million manufacturing jobs between early 2001 and late 2009. And despite small gains during the last two years, the trend in manufacturing employment for the last 30 years has been downward.

That has led some to argue that long-term job loss in the industry is inevitable. But our research shows otherwise.

There are two common versions of the “inevitability” argument. One holds that U.S. manufacturing wages are too high to be internationally competitive. The other maintains that manufacturing job losses are the result of productivity growth. Both arguments are wrong. Read more of this post

This Column Was 100% Made in America

A Hyundai ad that ran during Super Bowl coverage showed workers from the company's plant in Montgomery, Ala.

A Hyundai ad that ran during Super Bowl coverage showed workers from the company's plant in Montgomery, Ala.

By   Published: February 15, 2012

BLUE-COLLAR workers in fields like manufacturing — particularly when they make products on American soil — are again becoming a favorite subject for white-collar workers on Madison Avenue.

The trend was born of the economic worries that followed the financial crisis in 2008. Recently, it is gaining steam — appropriate, since the ads often use blasts of steam to signal something is being built — with proposals in Washington to offer incentives to encourage the location or relocation of factories in the United States.

“We continue to see very heavy emotional response to anything that would leverage against the bad economy,” said Robert Passikoff, president at Brand Keys, a brand and customer-loyalty consulting company in New York. Read more of this post

Can Manufacturing Jobs Come Back? What We Should Learn From Apple and Foxconn

business
The Huffington Post

David Paul – President, Fiscal Strategies Group  –  Posted: 02/13/2012 8:30 am

Apple aficionados suffered a blow a couple of weeks ago. All of those beautiful products, it turns out, are the product of an industrial complex that is nothing if not one step removed from slave labor.

But of course there is nothing new here. Walmart has long prospered as a company that found ways to drive down the cost of stuff that Americans want. And China has long been the place where companies to go to drive down cost.

For several decades, dating back to the post World War II years, relatively unfettered access to the American consumer has been the means for pulling Asian workers out of deep poverty. Japan emerged as an industrial colossus under the tutelage of Edward Deming. The Asian tigers came next. Vietnam and Sri Lanka have nibbled around the edges, while China embraced the export-led economic development model under Deng Xiaoping.

While Apple users have been beating their breasts over the revelations of labor conditions and suicides that sullied their glass screens, the truth is that Foxconn is just the most recent incarnation of outsourced manufacturing plants — textiles and Nike shoes come to mind — where working conditions are below American standards. Read more of this post

Walmart ‘Great for You’ Healthy Labels: Nutrition Experts Say ‘Devil in the Details’

 

BY BRIAN JOHNSON AND ENJOLI FRANCIS  –  WASHINGTON, Feb. 7, 2012

As Walmart announced plans today to label certain foods with a new green “Great for You” label, some diet and nutrition experts told ABC News they applauded the move, while others questioned whether a company that sells food could set objective standards for what is healthy.

Dr. Darwin Deen, a family doctor and nutrition educator, told ABC News that “an independent opinion of a food’s healthfulness is a good idea but as always, the devil is in the details.”

Walmart, the largest food retailer in United States, will put the new label on select products that meet defined criteria.in its Great Value and Marketside lines. Customers will begin to see the new label on products starting in the spring.

The company said the “Great for You” products meet the rigorous nutrition criteria established by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Institute of Medicine.

“Moms are telling us they want to make healthier choices for their families but need help deciphering all the claims and information already displayed on products,” said Andrea Thomas, senior vice president of sustainability at Walmart. Read more of this post

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