Trump tells manufacturers he will cut regulations, taxes, but must reshore

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Reuters

Ford Announces $1.6 Billion Investment in Mexico

Ford announces $1.6 billion investment in Mexico, derided by Trump

A Ford logo is pictured at a store of the automaker, in Mexico City, Mexico, April 5, 2016. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido

DETROIT/WASHINGTON/MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – Ford Motor Co (F.N) on Tuesday announced it would invest $1.6 billion to build more small cars in Mexico, starting in 2018, triggering a fresh blast of criticism from Republican front-runner Donald Trump. Read more of this post

Empty Talk on Manufacturing

Empty talk on manufacturing

We need politicians willing to protect us from unfair trade.

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Honest Co. Faces Big Questions After Lawsuits

03-14-16 Honest

Honest Co. headquarters in Santa Monica. The company, launched five years ago, pledged to “build a culture of honesty.” (Emily Berl)

When Honest Co. launched five years ago, the Santa Monica firm targeted a market uncommon among start-ups: diapers. Read more of this post

RIP Manufacturing Renaissance (and Reshoring) Claims

RIP Manufacturing Renaissance (and Reshoring) Claims

Because manufacturers (and others) don’t always do what they say, surveys of their intentions on hiring and investment and the like should always be taken with a big boulder of salt – the more so since the questions are often asked and the answers given in a political and policy context.

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The Case for Reshoring: Bring Quality Manufacturing Jobs to USA

The Case for Reshoring: Bring Quality Manufacturing Jobs To USAGood news for U.S. manufacturers: stateside production and employment opportunities are on the rise. Read more of this post

Nabisco to Cut Chicago jobs, Send Some Work to Mexico

 

Nabisco to Cut Chicago jobs, Send Some Work to Mexico

Mondelez International (Nabisco) will lay off half of its 1,200 employees in its bakery on Chicago’s Southwest Side after deciding to make a major investment in a Mexico plant rather than its long-standing facility here. Read more of this post

Report Finds 100+ Walmart.com Products Labeled “Made In U.S.A.” That Were Made Elsewhere

By June 29, 2015

Story-Image-1.3While there is no official review process required for labeling a product as “Made in the U.S.A.,” a company can get into legal trouble for misusing that label, as doing so may constitute false advertising. A new report from an advertising watchdog group claims that Walmart’s website has more than 100 examples of products incorrectly marketed as made in America.

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US Manufacturing Races Against ‘Biological Clock’

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By Michael Kling

Updated By Adam Reiser

John Ratzenberger on FOX NEWS Neil Cavuto

http://video.foxbusiness.com/v/3974724693001/john-ratzenberger-on-trade-schools-as-college-alternative/?#sp=show-clips

The lack of young people entering the manufacturing field threatens the future of the U.S. manufacturing renaissance, warns a new study.

Older workers, who dominate manufacturing, are leaving the work force in droves, but few young people are entering the field to replace them, according to the study from information and technology company ThomasNet.com. The study included responses from 1,209 engineers and purchasing agents, business owners and managers and sales and marketing executives from manufacturers, distributors and service companies.

Over three-fourths of manufacturing employees are 45 and older, the survey indicates.

“With Generation Y (18 to 32 years old) expected to make up 75 percent of the work force by 2025, and older employees exiting in droves, manufacturing’s ‘biological clock’ is ticking away,” the report notes.

Yet most manufacturers show a lack of urgency to fill their pipeline with skilled workers.

Three-quarters of companies surveyed say 25 percent or less of their work force are in the Generation Y age group. While 29 percent say they will increase employment of Generation Y workers in the next two years, almost half expect their numbers to stay the same.

Manufacturers say negative perceptions about work in their industry prompts young people to avoid the sector. But instead of being dirty, boring work, modern manufacturing is a high-tech world of computer-aided design and production. Half of survey respondents say a career in their industry provides satisfaction as well as competitive wages and benefits.

The shortage of skilled workers comes at a time when the industry is rebounding. Over half of manufacturers grew in 2012 and nearly two-thirds expect to grow this year. Nearly seven out of 10 will introduce new products this year.

“Considering that many companies (42 percent) are increasing employee headcount this year, the time to cultivate a new work force is now,” the study stresses.

Lack of basic skills in young workers is a drawback.

Manufacturers are developing partnerships with schools to help improve training and increase their emphasis on science, technology, engineering and mathematics. “The jury is out on whether these efforts alone will be enough,” the study says.

The United States is well-positioned to revitalize its manufacturing sector, says Philip Odette, president of Global Supply Chain Solutions, in an article for ManufacturingNet, an industry news site.

“The only thing missing is enough skilled workers to maintain the momentum.”

Companies must work to educate young people about the advantages of a career in manufacturing, he explains.

“Even something as simple as recording yourself demonstrating a process can boost the credibility of your company and increase its presence in the minds of students and teachers in your local area,” he advises. “Videos of new equipment or an impressive process don’t have to be reserved to sales pitches — they can be investments in attracting a new work force.”

Source: http://www.moneynews.com/Economy/manufacturing-skill-workers-US/2013/11/07/id/535317

Beijing announces emergency measures amid fog of pollution

See Original post on CNN

Bejing China Pic

By Paul Armstrong and Feng Ke, CNN

updated 2:39 AM EDT, Wed October 23, 2013

(CNN) — With its skies regularly shrouded by a filthy film of gray smog, bringing chaos to the transportation network and forcing millions to seek refuge behind surgical masks, Beijing has been forced to take more extreme action.

Officials in China’s capital this week announced a raft of emergency measures in a bid to tackle the problem, including mandatory factory closures and bans on cars entering the city on days when pollution levels are particularly high.

While Beijing is not alone when it comes to smoke-filled skies, this city of more than 20 million people has come to symbolize the environmental cost of China’s break-neck economic growth.

Red alert

The city’s Heavy Air Pollution Contingency Plan stipulates that when there is “serious pollution for three consecutive days,” a warning system comprising of blue, yellow, orange and red — the most serious — alerts will be activated. Kindergartens, primary and middle schools will then have to stop classes, while 80% of government-owned cars must be taken off the roads. Private cars will only be allowed to enter the city on alternate days according to ballot system of the numbers on their registration plates.

All freight vehicles and those transporting material for construction sites will be barred from the roads when the red alert is issued, while more watering carts and sprinkler trucks will take to the roads, the state-run China Dailyreported.

Factories in the city emitting pollutants will be required to cut their emissions or shut down completely when the orange warning signal is hoisted, while construction sites must halt excavation and demolition operations. Other measures include a ban on barbeques and fireworks on heavily polluted days.

Harmful to health

According to the plan, these emergency measures will come into play when the air quality index for fine particulate matter, PM2.5 — airborne particles considered most harmful to health — exceeds 300 micrograms per cubic meter for three days running. The “safe” limit is 25 micrograms, the World Health Organization says.

While the announcement has been broadly welcomed as a step in the right direction, doubt remains about its long-term effectiveness.

“The new emergency measures show the government’s determination to tackle the air pollution in Beijing, especially those regulations that limit car use and close schools and kindergartens on heavily polluted days. It shows that the authority has really paid attention to those vulnerable groups,” Huang Wei, a spokesman for Greenpeace East Asia, told CNN.

“But what is problematic is that those emergency measures are only targeted to those polluted days. It is rather a remedial measure than a preventative measure, and just to repair won’t help the issue in the long run.

“The air pollution in Beijing is mostly transmitted from other cities, and what Beijing can do is very limited. What the authority should do is to build a linkage mechanism, combining preventative measures with emergency control. For instance, factories in surrounding areas like Inner Mongolia, and Shandong Province could close their factories in advance before the potential transmission of serious pollutants. It should be collaborative work between cities, and only Beijing is not enough.”

Popular opinion

This view was backed by many ordinary Chinese on Weibo, China’s popular micro-blogging service.

“They should have some long-term thinking instead of always waiting till the crisis happens,” posted one user with the handle Shijinmilu.

Another, called Qinghualiuqingyu, asked: “How about those people who can’t afford an expensive house in the city and have to take cars to work every day?”

“Cars are not the main polluters, surrounding factories are. Sometimes the pollution level still goes up crazily even it’s around 2 or 3 a.m. The policy itself is good, but it’s more important how they implement it,” said TangyuanAllesGute.

Positive action

It is rather a remedial measure than a preventative measure, and just to repair won’t help the issue in the long run.
Huang Wei, Greenpeace

Last month, the central government in China announced plans to start listing its top ten most air-polluted citiesevery month in the hope that national humiliation will push positive environmental action.

“We must put air quality control as an ecological red line for economic management and social development,” China’s Vice Premier Zhang Gao Li said in a statement as he announced the new policy at the 18th Air Pollution Control Conference in Beijing.

Chinese officials did not say when the first list would be announced, but the northern megacities of Beijing and Tianjin, as well as the surrounding provinces of Hebei, Shanxi, Inner Mongolia and Shandong have signed onto an official plan to speed up air pollution control measures.

Meanwhile, life was returning to some semblance of normality in northeastern China Wednesday as days of smog-filled skiesbrought one city to a standstill.

Thick smog closed Harbin’s international airport, affecting hundreds of flights, and closed schools and businesses as visibility in some areas was reduced to less than 20 meters (65 feet). Some buildings could barely be seen from the opposite side of the street, while drivers brave enough to take to the roads were forced to flash their hazard warning lights.

The unusually severe pollution levels were blamed on the city’s coal-fired heating system, as well as farmers burning straw as temperatures in the region begin to drop.

 

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