Category: Labor

USDA’s School Lunch program must now comply with the recently signed E.O. 13788

Buy American Act Certified
Buy American Act Certified

On April 18th, 2017, President Donald Trump signed Executive Order #13788 into effect reinforcing the Buy American Act and requiring the US government to start implementing more ‘Buy American and Hire American’ policies with additional scrutiny. This not only affects manufacturers/vendors that sell to the US government, but also farmers that supply produce to school districts, government facilities, and more. More specifically, the USDA’s School Lunch program must now comply with the recently signed EO by discontinuing waivers and preferring procurement from US Farmers.

With EO #13788 following its scheduled timeline, there is increasing pressure for the U.S. Government to implement more scrutinized procurement policies regarding the Buy American Act (BAA). Luckily, there is an easy solution for farmers to proactively meet and exceed increased procurement regulations.

Continue reading “USDA’s School Lunch program must now comply with the recently signed E.O. 13788”

Adam Reiser: Trump administration struggles to enforce ‘Buy American’ EO 13788

Nearly eight months after President Donald J. Trump signed his executive order “Buy American and Hire American,” an expert on certifying whether goods are made in the United States shared with Big League Politics the challenges in certification and enforcing Trump’s intentions.

 

 

 

Adam Reiser, the CEO and founder of Certified, Inc., told Big League Politics he is seeing no action in the executive branch to move the president’s executive order forward.

A source familiar with how the White House drafted the executive order told Big League Politics: “There are zero teeth in it, you know? Let’s of fanfare, lots of publicity, back-slapping and hand-shaking with Trump–and now, it is getting resisted, like as if it meant nothing.”

According to the president’s directive, all agencies were supposed to have turned into both the Department of Commerce and the Office of Management and Budget how they plan to comply. These plans are to include, searchable databases of certified vendors, storage arrangements for the documents and simplifications of their internal procurement procedures.

Reiser said Trump’s executive order was the president’s attempt to bring federal procurement back in synch with the law.

The Buy American Act of 1933 was signed by President Herbert Hoover the day before he handed over the White House to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The Act was championed by Rep. Joseph W. Byrne, (D.-Tenn.), then the chairman of the House Appropriations Committee and later Speaker of the House.

Byrne’s idea was that given support by the Hearst newspapers and by Hoover’s Commissioner of Customs Francis F.A. Eble, who would go on to start the Buy American Club.

“The law says that the U.S. government has to show preferential treatment to U.S. manufacturers,” Reiser said. “It is so the government has to buy from its own.”

Reiser said that from the 1970s, the federal government has been providing waivers to the 1933 law. “In the 1980s and 1990s, it has picked up big-time.”

When the president signed Executive Order 13788, the White House was optimistic.

President Donald J. Trump holding his Executive Order 13788 at the April 18, 2017 Kenosha, Wis., signing ceremony. (White House photo)

A senior administration official speaking on background on Easter Monday, the day before the executive order was signed in the headquarters of the tool company Snap-On in Kenosha, Wisconsin, said the executive order would correct the abuse of the Buy American Act waiver process.

“Okay, so the culture immediately changes across the agencies.  We have a lax enforcement, lax monitoring, lax compliance,” the official said. Continue reading “Adam Reiser: Trump administration struggles to enforce ‘Buy American’ EO 13788”

Trump tells manufacturers he will cut regulations, taxes, but must reshore

reuters

Reuters

Trump asks the question: Which do you like better Made in America or Made in the USA?

Trump asks the question: Which do you like better Made in America or Made in the USA?

 

Made in America? 5 charged with fraud in alleged boot scheme

Made in America? 5 charged with fraud in alleged boot scheme

boot-fraud
September 16, 2016 (Photo Credit: Spc. Stephanie Ramirez/Army)
Executives and employees at Tennessee defense contractor for years assured the U.S. military that the boots they made for troops came from America when in fact they’d been shipped from China, the U.S. government alleges.

Five employees and principals of the former Wellco Enterprises Inc. were indicted this week in U.S. District Court in Greeneville, Tennessee. They appeared Thursday before U.S. Magistrate Judge Clifton Corker, pleading not guilty.

The defendants: Vincent L. Ferguson, 65, of Knoxville; Matthew L. Ferguson, 40, of Lenoir City; Kerry J. Ferguson, 35, of Houston; Matthew H. Martland, 32, of Knoxville; and Stephanie L. Kaemmerer, 44, of Knoxville.

The five are free on bond pending trial. Counts against them include wire fraud, major fraud against the United States and smuggling goods into the U.S.

The charges allege the defendants conspired from December 2008 to August 2012 in a scheme to sell thousands of bogus boots to the U.S. government for troops. From 2006 through 2012, the Defense Department paid Wellco more than $138 million for military footware, according to the indictment.
Continue reading “Made in America? 5 charged with fraud in alleged boot scheme”

Manufacturing Has Come Back And More Gains To Come

Manufacturing Has Come Back And More Gains To Come

The U.S. manufacturing sector is coming back, we learn from the Federal Reserve’s industrial production report. Last month’s gain was 0.9 percent, more than making up all the ground lost in the early months of this year. Looking forward, production will continue to expand, but don’t expect a lot more factory jobs. Continue reading “Manufacturing Has Come Back And More Gains To Come”

Factory fire causes nationwide knish shortage

 Gabila Food Products, Inc. shows their original Coney Island square knishs, which have been off the market for at least six weeks. A fire at a Long Island factory billed as the world’s biggest maker of knishes has led to a nationwide shortage of the fried, square doughy pillows of pureed potatoes and other fillings. (AP Photo/Gabila Food Products, Inc.)
Gabila Food Products, Inc. shows their original Coney Island square knishs, which have been off the market for at least six weeks. A fire at a Long Island factory billed as the world’s biggest maker of knishes has led to a nationwide shortage of the fried, square doughy pillows of pureed potatoes and other fillings. (AP Photo/Gabila Food Products, Inc.)

COPIAGUE, N.Y. –  A fire at a factory billed as the world’s biggest maker of knishes has created nationwide shock and oy for those who can’t seem to find the Jewish treats anywhere.

Kvetching has been going on at delis, diners, food carts and groceries since the six-week-long shortage began, but lovers of the square fried doughy pillows of pureed potatoes may not have to go without much longer. The factory promises an end to the knish crunch by Thanksgiving, which coincides with the start of Hanukkah.

“Our customers … are calling us saying they are literally searching supermarkets and stores and they’re all asking when we’ll be back,” Stacey Ziskin Gabay, one of the owners of the 92-year-old Gabila’s Knishes, which sells about 15 million knishes a year.

A fire Sept. 24 at the Gabila’s plant in Copiague, Long Island, damaged the machinery that makes the company’s biggest seller — “The Original Coney Island Square Knish,” which also come filled with kasha or spinach.

Gabila’s, which also makes matzoh balls, blintzes and latkas, sells the knishes both online and at retail outlets around the country, with New York, Florida and California leading the sales.

“For the last month I haven’t had any knishes — my heart is broken,” said Carol Anfuso, a native New Yorker who has been without a knish to nosh since the BJ’s Wholesale store near her Atlanta home suddenly stopped stocking them.

But Anfuso didn’t learn of the shortage until she visited her sister for lunch at the Pastrami King restaurant in Merrick, Long Island, and found that it was out of stock, too.

Pastrami King owner Joe Yamali said he normally sells about 2,000 knishes a month.

“It brings you back to your childhood and they’re just so delicious,” Yamali said. “Gabila is square and fried. You bite into it and the potato oozes out. It’s very good.”

Katz’s Delicatessen, the 125-year-old landmark on Manhattan’s Lower East Side, ordinarily sells about 6,000 knishes a month.

“I usually get four to take home,” grumbled Brooklyn native Forrest Gurl. “Their crunchiness, their hard corners, the mustard and sauerkraut you put on them. You can’t beat a knish.”

Like most places, the round, baked version is still available. But Gurl harumphed a familiar sentiment of knish devotees: “Who gets round knishes?”

Jesse Hochberg, a retired IT employee, didn’t know there was a shortage until he got to the Katz’s counter.

“I miss them,” he said.  “It’s something I grew up with. I like the taste, sliced with mustard. … I always look for them, and I haven’t seen them recently.”

Katz’s chef Kenny Kohn has grown weary of explaining the shortage to customers.  Along with the pastrami sandwiches, he serves up a typical New York attitude to the ongoing complaints.

“Get over it! Get a life! It’s just a knish.”