Shocking Truth About Garlic Imported From China

Known for its antibiotic features and helpful for treating many bacterial and inflammatory issues, the garlic is widely used not only in the preparation of many remedies, but thanks to its special flavors and scent also used in various dishes and even eaten raw.

But note, not every garlic found on the market is as safe to use, but the latest report of several researchers have shown that the garlic imported from China can have a bad influence on the organism and instead of healthy compounds it’s enriched with high levels of pesticides and deadly toxins.

Most of the garlic that was imported into the USA from China last year had high levels of banned toxic chemicals, which can have devastating effects on a person’s health.

It’s all due to outlawed/banned pesticides Chinese producers use, such as phorate and parathion to accelerate the growth of the products.

Therefore, all of these chemicals get transferred into the products resulting in harm to a human organism knowing how widely and often is used in our kitchens.

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7 Types of Sargento Cheese Recalled for Listeria

Eating the bacteria can be potentially fatal.

 

Hold the nachos. Sargento just recalled seven of its cheeses for a potential listeria contamination. An outbreak at one of its suppliers affected shredded and sliced varieties, including colby, jack and taco cheese.

Both the Ultra Thin Sliced Longhorn Colby and Chef Blends Shredded Nacho & Taco Cheese are possibly contaminated. Eating food with listeria can cause a serious infection, with symptoms like fever, muscle aches and gastrointestinal problems. According to the CDC, about 260 people die of listeriosis every year. Pregnant women, newborns and the elderly are especially vulnerable. So far, no known illnesses are associated with this recall.

The supplier, Deustch Kase Haus in Middlebury, Indiana, makes cheese for other stores as well. Meijer is recalling its Meijer Brand Colby Cheese and Colby Jack Cheese, which was sold at deli counters between November 10 and February 9. Shoppers are encouraged throw it away or return it for a full refund.

Cheese from Sara Lee and Amish Classics as well as salads from Taylor Farms have also been affected, so double-check your lunch before chowing down.

Whole Foods To Close Nine Stores & Scale Back Expansion Plans

Whole Foods to close 9 stores amid sluggish sales

Whole Foods Market said Wednesday it will close nine stores in the second quarter as it abandons its goal to open 1,200-plus stores.

“We’re going to continue to grow, but I think we’re going to be a more disciplined growth company than we have been in the past,” John Mackey, co-founder and CEO of Whole Foods, told analysts on the company’s first-quarter earnings call.

Mackey called the closing of the nine stores a “difficult but prudent decision” and said the company will now have more targeted site selection and “continued moderation in ending square footage growth.” He said these moves together will “result in a healthier bottom line, increased cash flow and higher returns.”

Still, the Texas-based company also said it welcomed 14 new stores in the first quarter, including two outlet relocations.

Mackey added the retailer remains “optimistic about the future growth potential for our 365 format but we want to see how this next round of stores perform before getting more aggressive.”

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Tyson Foods under federal investigation for alleged chicken price fixing

Foxnews.com

 (iStock)

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission subpoenaed Tyson Foods Monday, investigating allegations of colluding to drive up chicken prices starting as far back as 2008.

The Springdale, Arkansas-based company and its largest competitors have been named as defendants in a series of lawsuits filed over the last few months. Tyson and the other producers have thus far vehemently denied all allegations. 

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Scientists Use DNA Testing to Detect Seafood Fraud

bluefin-tuna-was-the-only-fish-that-was-labeled-in-100-of-samples

How much did you pay for that slice of halibut sashimi? What about those two pieces of red snapper? According to a study published in the journal Conservation Biology on Friday, you likely paid too much. This may be frustrating news for sushi lovers, but it’s good news for flounder lovers: Any time you’ve been served halibut in a sushi restaurant, rest assured that you probably ate flounder. But the problem is much broader than just this one substitution. Demian Willette, of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of California Los Angeles , and his colleagues found that 47 percent of the samples they collected were mislabeled. That means your odds of getting the sushi you ordered are slightly better than a coin toss.

If you think this is an issue associated with lower-tier sushi joints, think again. Willette and his colleagues had their undergraduate students gather samples over four years from 26 sushi restaurants that were rated highly by customers on Zagat and Yelp in the greater Los Angeles area. They used a genetic testing technique called DNA barcoding, in which particular portions of DNA can be used to identify an individual as part of a species, to verify the identities of the samples. All of the restaurants had at least one incident of mislabeling during the four year period, with an average mislabeling rate of 45.5 percent.

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Jessica Alba’s Honest Co recalls organic baby powder in US

  • Jessica Alba, Founder and Chief Creative Officer of The Honest Company, speaks at the Milken Institute Global Conference in Beverly Hills, California, U.S., May 3, 2016.

    Jessica Alba, Founder and Chief Creative Officer of The Honest Company, speaks at the Milken Institute Global Conference in Beverly Hills, California, U.S., May 3, 2016.  (REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson)

The Honest Company, the brand co-founded by actress Jessica Alba, issued a voluntary recall for all bottles of its organic baby powder sold in the United States over concerns of eye and skin infections. The California-based company said that the decision was reached after recent tests detected possible contaminations from microorganisms that could cause infection.

“With the full knowledge and under the guidance of the FDA, we’ve decided to voluntarily recall this product out of an abundance of caution,” Christopher Gavigan, co-founder, said in a video on The Honest Company’s website. Read more of this post

Plastic or Not? Over 100 Bags of Fake Rice Seized in Nigeria

Plastic or Not? Over 100 Bags of Fake Rice Seized in NigeriaNigerian authorities have seized 2.5 metric tons of reportedly fake rice during the holiday season. Read more of this post

Yummi Bears vitamins are falsely labeled as ‘MADE IN USA’

Legal News Line

Louie Torres

yummi-bears

CHICAGO (Legal Newsline) – An Illinois man alleges a Santa Ana, California, company uses misleading and inaccurate labels on its vitamins.

Matt Wisniewski filed a complaint on behalf of all others similarly situated in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, Eastern Division against Hero Nutritionals Inc. alleging violation of the Uniform Deceptive Trade Practices Act, the Illinois Consumer Fraud and Deceptive Business Practices Act and other counts.

According to the complaint, the plaintiff alleges that he suffered damages as the result of being misled into purchasing the defendant’s Yummi Bears vitamins, which he believed to be domestically sourced because of the words “Made in the USA” on the label. The plaintiff holds Hero Nutritionals Inc. responsible because the defendant allegedly uses foreign-sourced ingredients in the vitamins and the Made in USA label is deceptive.

The plaintiff requests a trial by jury and seeks injunction against the defendant, award plaintiff compensatory and punitive damages, all legal fees and interest, and any further relief the court grants. He is represented by John E. Norris of Davis & Norris LLP in Birmingham, Alabama, and Julie Simpson of Simpson Law Group in St. Charles, Illinois.

U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, Eastern Division Case number 1:16-cv-07144

Original Link

http://legalnewsline.com/stories/510965828-consumer-alleges-yummi-bears-vitamins-are-falsely-labeled-as-made-in-usa

“Organic” Food From China Found To Be Highly Contaminated

Food imported from China and labeled “organic” is anything but.

Chinese Market

With more and more people learning about the importance of eating healthy and safe produce, consumer demand for all things “organic” has skyrocketed. In the US alone, annual organic food sales have grown by 20% and the increased demand is significantly outpacing domestic supplies, forcing many grocers and food vendors to look internationally to keep their businesses stocked. Most of these organic imports are grown in the European Union, where organic standards are weaker than those of the US. However, many of these “organic” products are from China, whose food industry standards for safety and quality are notoriously low. Much of this “organic” produce grown in China is so unsafe, that the farmers who grow it won’t eat it themselves. Isn’t that the whole point of choosing organic in the first place?

It turns out that much of the food labelled “organic” was never grown with the intention of being organic, but rather as a means to circumvent China’s reputation for substandard produce. US Customs personnel often reject entire shipments of food from China due to the addition of dangerous and unsavory additives, the presence of drug residues, mislabeling, or the poor hygienic state of the food. In an effort to get around these bulk rejections of food, some Chinese food exporters have taken to labeling their products “organic,” especially those foods that appear dirty or unusual. In addition, the “organic” label in China has no meaning as collusion between the government and manufacturers has led to rampant mislabeling, and China’s government has no established system for determining what is or is not organic.
Chinese Fish Master

Dead fish being removed after a fertilizer factory dumped huge amounts of ammonia into the Fu river Credit – NYT

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Eggo waffles recalled due to listeria concerns | Kellogg

eggo-shortage

(Photo: Phil Coale, AP)

 

The Food and Drug Administration letter, dated June 7, was sent less than two years after a Kellogg Eggo waffle plant in the same state was shut for similar reasons.

The inspection found flies and pools of water, the FDA said. The letter from District Director John Gridley didn’t say that any products were tainted with listeria, yet said they were “adulterated” and “may have become contaminated with filth.” The Augusta plant makes Keebler and Famous Amos cookies, and is one of five cookie bakeries Kellogg operates in North America.

“While the FDA did not identify specific concerns with the food, we take this situation very seriously,” Kris Charles, a spokeswoman for Battle Creek, Michigan-based Kellogg, said in an e-mail. “We have undertaken a number of aggressive actions to address their concerns including comprehensive cleaning and extensive testing.”

Kellogg’s response didn’t include dates for taking action at the plant, the FDA said. The regulator gave Kellogg 15 days to outline specific remedies to avoid injunction or product seizure.

Eggo Production

Kellogg’s cookies are baked at a temperature high enough to kill any listeria present, according to Robert Gravani, a food science professor at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. The lack of an FDA product recall suggests that listeria was not found in the cookies, he said. FDA spokeswoman Tamara Ward declined to comment on a potential recall.

Listeria is a bacterium found in prepared foods and soil that can cause a serious infection in humans called listeriosis. It is particularly harmful to pregnant women, the young, the elderly, and people with weak immune systems, according to the FDA’swebsite.

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