USDA’s School Lunch program must now comply with the recently signed E.O. 13788

Buy American Act Certified

Buy American Act Certified

On April 18th, 2017, President Donald Trump signed Executive Order #13788 into effect reinforcing the Buy American Act and requiring the US government to start implementing more ‘Buy American and Hire American’ policies with additional scrutiny. This not only affects manufacturers/vendors that sell to the US government, but also farmers that supply produce to school districts, government facilities, and more. More specifically, the USDA’s School Lunch program must now comply with the recently signed EO by discontinuing waivers and preferring procurement from US Farmers.

With EO #13788 following its scheduled timeline, there is increasing pressure for the U.S. Government to implement more scrutinized procurement policies regarding the Buy American Act (BAA). Luckily, there is an easy solution for farmers to proactively meet and exceed increased procurement regulations.

Read more of this post

Adam Reiser: Trump administration struggles to enforce ‘Buy American’ EO 13788

Nearly eight months after President Donald J. Trump signed his executive order “Buy American and Hire American,” an expert on certifying whether goods are made in the United States shared with Big League Politics the challenges in certification and enforcing Trump’s intentions.

 

 

 

Adam Reiser, the CEO and founder of Certified, Inc., told Big League Politics he is seeing no action in the executive branch to move the president’s executive order forward.

A source familiar with how the White House drafted the executive order told Big League Politics: “There are zero teeth in it, you know? Let’s of fanfare, lots of publicity, back-slapping and hand-shaking with Trump–and now, it is getting resisted, like as if it meant nothing.”

According to the president’s directive, all agencies were supposed to have turned into both the Department of Commerce and the Office of Management and Budget how they plan to comply. These plans are to include, searchable databases of certified vendors, storage arrangements for the documents and simplifications of their internal procurement procedures.

Reiser said Trump’s executive order was the president’s attempt to bring federal procurement back in synch with the law.

The Buy American Act of 1933 was signed by President Herbert Hoover the day before he handed over the White House to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The Act was championed by Rep. Joseph W. Byrne, (D.-Tenn.), then the chairman of the House Appropriations Committee and later Speaker of the House.

Byrne’s idea was that given support by the Hearst newspapers and by Hoover’s Commissioner of Customs Francis F.A. Eble, who would go on to start the Buy American Club.

“The law says that the U.S. government has to show preferential treatment to U.S. manufacturers,” Reiser said. “It is so the government has to buy from its own.”

Reiser said that from the 1970s, the federal government has been providing waivers to the 1933 law. “In the 1980s and 1990s, it has picked up big-time.”

When the president signed Executive Order 13788, the White House was optimistic.

President Donald J. Trump holding his Executive Order 13788 at the April 18, 2017 Kenosha, Wis., signing ceremony. (White House photo)

A senior administration official speaking on background on Easter Monday, the day before the executive order was signed in the headquarters of the tool company Snap-On in Kenosha, Wisconsin, said the executive order would correct the abuse of the Buy American Act waiver process.

“Okay, so the culture immediately changes across the agencies.  We have a lax enforcement, lax monitoring, lax compliance,” the official said. Read more of this post

Shocking Truth About Garlic Imported From China

Known for its antibiotic features and helpful for treating many bacterial and inflammatory issues, the garlic is widely used not only in the preparation of many remedies, but thanks to its special flavors and scent also used in various dishes and even eaten raw.

But note, not every garlic found on the market is as safe to use, but the latest report of several researchers have shown that the garlic imported from China can have a bad influence on the organism and instead of healthy compounds it’s enriched with high levels of pesticides and deadly toxins.

Most of the garlic that was imported into the USA from China last year had high levels of banned toxic chemicals, which can have devastating effects on a person’s health.

It’s all due to outlawed/banned pesticides Chinese producers use, such as phorate and parathion to accelerate the growth of the products.

Therefore, all of these chemicals get transferred into the products resulting in harm to a human organism knowing how widely and often is used in our kitchens.

Read more of this post

The Ups and Downs of Made in the USA

industry week logo

| IndustryWeek

Joao Silva works with Baxter the cobot on Tinkertoys at the Rodon plant in Pennsyvania. K’Nex

 For many companies, the 2008-09 recession was a time to scale back. But for Michael Araten, CEO and president of the toy company K’Nex Industries, it was a time to rethink and regroup.

K’Nex, which makes Tinkertoys and Lincoln Logs as well as its eponymous brightly colored building sets, followed the trend of offshoring in the late 1990s, and by the early 2000s had outsourced most of its toymaking to China.

But by the time Araten arrived at the company in 2005, the long lead time required to ship toys to the United States—coupled with high demand only three months out of the year—was becoming a strain on the business. Catering to the changing tastes of 8-year-olds is a dicey proposition, and product decisions made in January could be yesterday’s news nine months later when the ship pulled into port.

With machines idling at K’Nex’s sister company, Rodon, a plastics manufacturer in Pennsylvania, Araten saw an opening to bring the toy production back home. “We were looking to keep our people employed,” he said.

Read more of this post

Detroit, Shinola is ‘Made in USA’ success story

 

detroit-shinola

Detroit (AFP) – From the outside, there’s nothing much to say about this nondescript, hulking building in downtown Detroit, once the cradle of American industry.

But inside this former General Motors research lab, the fifth floor has been transformed into a state-of-the-art workshop producing watches and high-end bicycles.

Welcome to Shinola, a young American luxury lifestyle company breathing new life into the “Made in USA” label — a designation championed by President-elect Donald Trump.

The firm, which shares the building with a design school, has built an open factory space with wooden desks reminiscent of 1950s movie sets and high-tech machinery.

Watches, handbags, appointment books and other accessories carrying the “Made in Detroit” label are turned out here, while the bikes — made from parts designed in neighboring Wisconsin — and turntables, a new product, are assembled at the flagship store located nearby.

Dozens of employees work here — most of them African Americans, who make up the majority of residents in this blighted working-class city, forced into bankruptcy in 2013 under the weight of its massive debt.

Detroit suffered hugely from the decline of US manufacturing and especially the difficulties facing the “Big Three” — auto giants General Motors, Ford and Fiat Chrysler.

The unemployment rate hit 10.4 percent in November, compared to the national average of 4.6 percent, according to official statistics.

Read more of this post

Jessica Alba’s Honest Co recalls organic baby powder in US

  • Jessica Alba, Founder and Chief Creative Officer of The Honest Company, speaks at the Milken Institute Global Conference in Beverly Hills, California, U.S., May 3, 2016.

    Jessica Alba, Founder and Chief Creative Officer of The Honest Company, speaks at the Milken Institute Global Conference in Beverly Hills, California, U.S., May 3, 2016.  (REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson)

The Honest Company, the brand co-founded by actress Jessica Alba, issued a voluntary recall for all bottles of its organic baby powder sold in the United States over concerns of eye and skin infections. The California-based company said that the decision was reached after recent tests detected possible contaminations from microorganisms that could cause infection.

“With the full knowledge and under the guidance of the FDA, we’ve decided to voluntarily recall this product out of an abundance of caution,” Christopher Gavigan, co-founder, said in a video on The Honest Company’s website. Read more of this post

Yummi Bears vitamins are falsely labeled as ‘MADE IN USA’

Legal News Line

Louie Torres

yummi-bears

CHICAGO (Legal Newsline) – An Illinois man alleges a Santa Ana, California, company uses misleading and inaccurate labels on its vitamins.

Matt Wisniewski filed a complaint on behalf of all others similarly situated in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, Eastern Division against Hero Nutritionals Inc. alleging violation of the Uniform Deceptive Trade Practices Act, the Illinois Consumer Fraud and Deceptive Business Practices Act and other counts.

According to the complaint, the plaintiff alleges that he suffered damages as the result of being misled into purchasing the defendant’s Yummi Bears vitamins, which he believed to be domestically sourced because of the words “Made in the USA” on the label. The plaintiff holds Hero Nutritionals Inc. responsible because the defendant allegedly uses foreign-sourced ingredients in the vitamins and the Made in USA label is deceptive.

The plaintiff requests a trial by jury and seeks injunction against the defendant, award plaintiff compensatory and punitive damages, all legal fees and interest, and any further relief the court grants. He is represented by John E. Norris of Davis & Norris LLP in Birmingham, Alabama, and Julie Simpson of Simpson Law Group in St. Charles, Illinois.

U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, Eastern Division Case number 1:16-cv-07144

Original Link

http://legalnewsline.com/stories/510965828-consumer-alleges-yummi-bears-vitamins-are-falsely-labeled-as-made-in-usa

Apple: Many ‘genuine’ Apple products on Amazon are fake

Oct. 17, 2016, that it has been buying Apple products labeled as genuine on Amazon.com and has found nearly 90 percent of them are counterfeit.

Oct. 17, 2016, that it has been buying Apple products labeled as genuine on Amazon.com and has found nearly 90 percent of them are counterfeit.

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Apple says it has been buying Apple chargers and cables labeled as genuine on Amazon.com and has found nearly 90 percent of them to be counterfeit.

The revelation comes in a federal lawsuit filed by Apple against a New Jersey company on Monday over what Apple says are counterfeit products that were sold on Amazon.

In the lawsuit, Apple says Mobile Star imprinted Apple logos on cables and chargers that “pose a significant risk of overheating, fire, and electrical shock.” It says the chargers and cables were being sold on Amazon as genuine Apple products.

Apple says it purchased the products on Amazon and later told the online retailer that they were fake. Amazon then identified Mobile Star as the source.

Amazon isn’t named in the suit, but said in a statement that it has “zero tolerance” for counterfeiters on its site and that it pursues “wrongdoers” aggressively. Mobile Star didn’t return a voicemail seeking comment.

 

 

 

 

 

AP: https://www.yahoo.com/tech/apple-many-genuine-apple-products-amazon-fake-142356031.html

Locally Bought Crayons Tests Positive for Asbestos

Locally Bought Crayons Tests Positive for Asbestos

As backpacks fill up with school supplies, nearly every kid will toss in a box of crayons. It should be the least of parents worries, but what if we told you some brands contain asbestos? It’s a mineral historically used for insulating that’s known to cause cancer and other lung problems. Read more of this post

Group Finds Asbestos in Children’s Crayons

Group Finds Asbestos in Children's Crayons

Four of 28 boxes of crayons tested positive for asbestos, according to the newly released report from the advocacy group. A private lab hired by the EWG Action Fund, a sister organization of the Environmental Working Group, also detected and confirmed asbestos in two of 21 toy crime lab kits it evaluated. Read more of this post

%d bloggers like this: